Don’t drive angry: P-plater learns tough lesson after backroad blast

Posted on July 8, 2024Comments Off on Don’t drive angry: P-plater learns tough lesson after backroad blast

An 18-year old P-plater is now more than $3000 poorer and will be without their licence for at least six months after hitting 124km/h in a 60km/h zone, allegedly blaming a bad mood for his erratic behaviour.

At 10pm on Saturday July 6, Hawkesbury Highway Patrol officers were performing stationary speed enforcement on Springwood Road in Agnes Banks when they heard an “excessively loud” engine approaching.

According to officers, the approaching vehicle “sounded as though it was driving hard and accelerating harshly”, which was soon confirmed when the Mazda 3 came into view, with its speed being detected at 124km/h by LiDAR.

Police soon stopped the vehicle where the driver produced his P1 Provisional licence, however there were no P-plates affixed to the Mazda.

Upon being questioned by police as to why he was doing more than double the 60km/h speed limit, the teenager allegedly responded: “I had an argument at a party and when I left, I was p’d off!”

He also claimed the red P-plates “must have flew off”.

For his troubles, he was issued a penalty notice for exceeding the speed limit by more than 45km/h and for not complying with licence conditions (displaying P-plates).

New South Wales P1 licence holders can be fined $2959 and issued six demerit points for going 45km/h or more above the speed limit, while not displaying P-plates attracts a $320 fine and two demerit points.

In addition to having his licence suspended on the spot for three months, he will face an additional three-month suspension for exceeding the four demerit point limit for P1 drivers.

New South Wales Highway Patrol offered a timely reminder to only drive with a cool head, not only to avoid a fine but keep other road users safe.

“If feeling angry or stressed behind the wheel when driving, police urge drivers to pull over, take a moment and not to continue driving until their emotions are in check,” the unit said.

“This will prevent drivers from making irrational decisions or actions while controlling a motor vehicle that could result in devastating consequences.”